Metal Halide

Metal Halide

20 - 22 Watt

20 & 22 Watt ballast for Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like electroni

35/39 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 35 or 39 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID,

50 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 50 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like ele

70 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 70 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like ele

100 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 100 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like

150 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 150 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

175 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 175 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like

200 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 200 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

250 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 250 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

315 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 315 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

320 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 320 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

350 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 350 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

400 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 400 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

750 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 750 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

875 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 875 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like el

1000 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 1000 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like e

1500 Watt

Metal Halide Ballast for 1500 Watt Metal Halide Lamps. Electronic HID, like e

High Intensity Discharge ballasts operate a vast array of High Pressure Sodium, Quartz Metal Halide, and Ceramic Metal Halide HID lamps in the market today. HID lamps are similar to fluorescent lamps in that they are gas discharge lamps. The arc tube, made from Quartz glass or ceramic materials is located within the ‘jacket’ of the lamp and contains electrodes at either end of the tube. The arc tube generates light when the electrodes at either end of the tube initiate an electrical arc. This excites the pressurized sodium or metal halide gasses causing them to emit light. Like fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to operate. The primary role of the ballast is to supply the correct starting and operating voltage to initiate the arc, and to regulate current and voltage to sustain the arc once illuminated. 

Input Voltages

HID lighting in the United States takes power at one of five voltages; 120,208, 240, 277, or 480V. While 120/277V are the most common in the United States because of the ready availability of power sources at these voltages, 208 and 240V are often utilized because of the heavier loads and longer runs associated with HID lighting (large malls, factories, parking lots). In order to accommodate all of these different voltage inputs, GE lighting offers ballasts with multiple input voltage taps.

Ballasts are available in:

5-Tap (120/208/240/277/480V)

Quad Tap (120/208/240/277V)

Tri-Tap (120/277/347V) (for the Canadian Market)

480V (480/with 120 Aux Tap)

Not all ballasts wattages are available in all configurations.

HID magnetic ballasts consist of robust core and coil designs that meet or exceed minimum ANSI requirements. These ballasts are typically sold as distributor replacement kits which are pre-wired with a capacitor, ignitor (if applicable) and all necessary mounting hardware and instructions. Each wattage is typically offered in quad (MLT-120/208/240/277 volt), 5-tap (ML5-120/208/240/277/480 volt) or 480 volt (48T) options. 

Lamp Operation

Gas discharge lamps have a negative resistance characteristic, which causes them to draw increasing amounts of current and can result in immediate lamp failure if operated directly from the main power line. It is the purpose of the ballast to prevent this by limiting current provided to the lamp for smooth and consistent operation. The ratio of light output produced by a lamp operating on a ballast vs. the lamp’s rated life output is referred to as the ‘Ballast Factor’. All GE HID ballasts have a ballast factor of 1.0, providing full luminance. When ignited HID lamps take time to warm-up and reach full luminance. Any interruption of input power or a sudden voltage drop may cause the arc to extinguish. Hot HID lamps will not restrike immediately. Prior to restrike, the arc tube must cool enough to reduce the vapor pressure within the tube to a point where the arc will be able to reestablish itself. The typical warm up and restrike times of HID lamps are below.

HID Input voltage Chart

Electromagnetic HID Ballast The typical electromagnetic ballast is the exposed core & coil ballast, which is commonly used as a component in HID luminaires. This type of ballast is called a core and coil because it consists of one or two copper coils on a ‘core’ of high-grade electrical steel laminations which are welded together. The ballast is then vacuum impregnated with a specialized varnish chosen for its electrical, thermal, and sound attenuating properties. All GE Core & Coil ballasts have a UL Class H thermal rating (180°C).

Core and Coil Probe Start QMH 

Probe Start Quartz Metal Halide lamps between the wattages of 175W and 1500W utilize an additional electrode, or probe, at one end of the arc tube to facilitate lamp ignition. Probe Start fixtures rely on the Open Circuit voltage to initiate the arc

Core and Coil Pulse Start QMH or CMH®

Pulse Start Metal Halide lamps 150W and below utilize Pulse Start technology. Additionally, newer Ceramic Metal Halide Lamps require Pulse Start technology to ignite properly. Quartz Metal Halide Lamps 150W and less also require the use of an igniter to provide a high voltage initial ‘pulse’ to ignite the lamp. In QMH applications, once the initial arc is established the igniter stops pulsing and the lamps ‘warm’ up to full lumen output. Metal Halide lamps 150W and below utilize Pulse Start technology. 

Core and Coil Pulse Start HPS 

Pulse Start High Pressure Sodium (HPS) lamps utilize Pulse Start technology. HPS lamps have no starting electrodes; rather, they utilize an igniter to induce a high voltage initial starting ‘pulse’ (3-5kV) across the main electrodes in the lamp. All HPS Lamps require pulse start ignition. In HPS applications, once the initial arc is established the igniter stops pulsing and the lamps ‘warm’ up to full lumen output.